Raleigh may have already shown the 2018 Redux IE at Interbike, but we were too excited to ride one to wait. In the mean time, the company sent over the 2017 version which is still available through their website (and discounted with free shipping!).

 

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

When it comes to their e-bikes, Raleigh (and iZip) take a multi-faceted approach towards motors and batteries. At the higher end, you’ll find bikes like the Redux IE which combine a Brose motor with the battery integrated into the down tube. Not only does this make the bike look better, it also helps to keep the weight low for better handling and allows for a single bottle cage inside the front triangle.

In the U.S., the Redux IE is a Class 3 Pedalec meaning it only provides assistance while you are pedaling and it will assist up to 28 mph. It gets there with a 250W motor with 90Nm of torque.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

On the 36V li-ion battery itself (which is locked into the frame with a key), you’ll find the power button and the magnetic charging port. The power button it simple on/off affair, and the charging port is also very simple – line up the plug and let the magnets do the work. The charger reads yellow when charging, green when fully charged, or red if there’s an issue. The charging port cap is not attached, so don’t lose it while you’re adding juice. It would be nice if Raleigh added a magnet somewhere to the bike to keep the cap while charging, or simply added a leash.

Measuring 496.8Wh, the battery claims to deliver 35-80 miles of range, though if you’re a speed demon like me who runs on Sport mode all the time, you’ll see the lower end of that spectrum. The bike has four levels of assist – completely human powered, Eco, Tour, and Sport which is the highest.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

Once powered up, you’re presented with necessary data through the Brose head unit. The easy to read screen lets you know battery life, current speed, trip data, overall odometer, time, and the assist mode. All of which can be controlled through the handlebar mounted remote on the left side. The up or down arrows toggle through assist settings, while the center button toggles through screens on the display. I moved the remote from the stock position so I could access it with my thumb while riding rather than having to take my hand off the grip to reach it when it was farther inboard. This did require some creative wire routing though, so keep that in mind. Also if you move the remote don’t lose the hardware inside – it’s tiny, and it will fall out.

I assume that the extra wiring connections strapped to the rear brake hose would allow for hardwired lights to be added – something I wish the Redux came with stock.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

One nice feature of the head unit though is that there is a USB port hidden underneath so you could charge your electronics or light while riding. However, if you’re like me an want to slam the stem, you’ll have to cut the steerer tube down to access it. A few other interesting features are the TranzX Anti-Shock seatpost and stem which have elastomers built in to absorb road vibrations.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

As for the drivetrain itself, one of the best parts of the Brose system is that the center drive motor utilizes a full size chainring. This is better for drivetrain wear and gearing purposes which isn’t something you’d notice right away. The chain is then sandwiched between two guards to keep it from derailing, and the whole chainring itself is on a freewheel mechanism (which isn’t super durable, but more on that in the review). Also note that the pedals in the photos are not included with the bike. I decided to throw on some more aggressive pedals which turned out to be a bad idea (see issue with freewheel above). Stick with the stock pedals or something that’s not a massive MTB pedal and you’ll be fine.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

As a result of the full size chainring, the Redux IE gets away with a small cassette and a Shimano Deore 1×10 drivetrain.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

Built around a 6061 custom butted aluminum frame with “city geometry”, the Redux keeps things tight with 15 x 100mm front and 12 x 142mm rear thru axle hubs. If you plan on loading your bike with bags, a rack, and groceries, thru axles will make a big difference – especially given the weight of the stock bike. Shimano M365 hydraulic disc brakes with a 180mm front and 160mm rear rotor bring things to a halt, and a massive rear mounted kickstand is included. You’ll also find full rack and fender mounts should you want ’em.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

Wrapping things up are the Schwalbe Big Ben 27.5 x 2.0″ tires on Alex MD21 rims with Novatec hubs. The tires are a nice fit and seem to offer good flat protection with the K-Guard, though this is one of the many areas the 2018 version improves with bigger rubber and rims.

Just In: 2017 Raleigh Redux IE e-bike is ready to take on the city

At 46lbs 14oz (21.26kg), the Redux IE is hefty, but not unwieldy. Like most e-bikes, to make it easier to move around or put on a rack, you can remove the battery which takes out a big chunk.

Offered in three sizes, I went with the medium which fits my 5’8″ frame quite well. Currently, the 2017 Redux IE is for sale at $2,699 from Raleigh Electric directly, which includes free shipping in the continental US.

Stay tuned for the final review!

raleighelectric.com

3 COMMENTS

  1. “I decided to throw on some more aggressive pedals which turned out to be a bad idea (see issue with freewheel above).” How exactly do the pedals make any difference? Just curious.

    • The pedals were slightly wider than stock and have very aggressive pins. I was going around a corner a bit hot and managed to catch the pedal on a raised spot on the pavement and it snagged hard enough to damage the freewheel. The wider the pedal, the less clearance with the ground you have when the bike is leaned over.

  2. Personally, I can’t stand the look of these integrated battery packs. Lots of companies using them so I must be in the minority. Anyone else or am I alone?

What do you think?